Artists

 

Here we will recognise and feature some of our artists, giving you a behind the scenes look into the artist at work to gain an understanding of their background, driving forces and inspiration. We are gradually adding to this list. Please contact us if you have a story you wish to tell.

Frank Carpay

Trained at Hertogenbosch Technical School in Hertogenbosch, Carpay studied ceramics, metalwork, graphic art and textile design. In 1950 he spent time with Pablo Picasso and worked at the Madoura Pottery in Valauris, also meeting pottery decorators Roger Capron and Roger Picault. After returning to the Netherlands and establishing his own small commercial pottery, Carpay met with difficulties and his pottery business was closed. In the early 1950s, he wrote to the Mayor of Auckland John Allum enquiring if there was work available in any Auckland potteries. Crown Lynn Potteries Ltd were looking for new designers at the time, and in ...
Read More

Daniel Steenstra

Daniel Steenstra emigrated to New Zealand from Holland with his brother Thijs in about 1952 and began working at Crown Lynn the next year. He stayed for around 20 years. There Daniel produced a range of different products in different sizes but is known for his elegant vases which were mainly glazed in single colours or decorated by other hand decorators at the factory. Influences Daniel was in the third generation of family potters who produced ‘snywerk’ which means carving. The area of Holland they came from – Friesland (formerly Frisia) – was known for this type of work. It ...
Read More

Dave Jenkin

David (Dave) Jenkin was hired by Tom Clark in 1945 straight from Elam School of Art. In 1948 he was made head of the Design department and remained a key figure in the company and Tom Clark’s right hand man. He was responsible for expanding the company’s design repertoire until his retirement in 1979. Initially Dave was employed to translate existing English pottery shapes into designs including the early swans, railway cups and mixing bowls. Tom Clark, manager of Crown Lynn, had an interest in good design and in 1948 he visited potteries in Europe which inspired him to improve ...
Read More

Mark Cleverley

From 1967 until 1979 Mark Cleverley was a mainstay of Crown Lynn design. A professional designer, he worked with design manager Dave Jenkin to move from largely conservative wares to the forefront of industrial design in New Zealand. Employment Dave Jenkin hired Mark Cleverley in 1967 as Development designer. He was a trained artist and designer and was already known to Crown Lynn because he had won two of the design competitions and entered others. His role was to look at world trends and produce designs in keeping with overseas tastes but with New Zealand style. His designs were adventurous ...
Read More

Ernest Shufflebotham

Ernest Shufflebotham was an Englishman who had been trained by New Zealand-born Keith Murray at Wedgwood in Stoke-on-Trent. In 1948 Ernest came to work at Crown Lynn after seeing an advertisement in a Stoke-on-Trent newspaper posted by Tom Clark. He was employed to produce more upmarket works that would expand the market for Crown Lynn ceramics. He was one of the few professional 'throwers' working in New Zealand during the period from his arrival in 1948 to his departure in 1957. He continued the 'machined' style used by Murray and would 'throw' the clay on a pottery wheel to create ...
Read More

Dorothy Thorpe

Design Awards On Friday night, the 24th of September 1965, a crowd of 400 people gathered for a cocktail party in the function rooms at 246 Queen Street, above Crown Lynn’s flagship store. The crowd was a mix of designers, design aficionados, Crown Lynn sales reps from around the country and members of parliament, who were all her to celebrate the design awards. Everyone who entered was personally welcomed by Crown Lynn Managing Director, Tom Clark. [1] During the design awards to launch the range of dinnerware styled by Dorothy Thorpe “A fashion parade of china, as elegant as any ...
Read More

Juliet Hawkins

Juliet joined Crown Lynn Potteries as an Assistant Designer after graduating from a Graphic Design Diploma at Auckland Technical Institute in 1979. At the end of the year companies would come to the Polytech to check out the graduate’s work. Juliet was offered a position in the design studio at Crown Lynn. Juliet was a prolific designer and her most popular design, Last Wave, was one of the best selling patterns of the time. So much so, they increased the product range to include cookware the following year. Influences The chief designers at that time were Dave Jenkin and Mark ...
Read More